5 Reasons Why You should Love English


In this wonderful world there are very few languages that are elegant and refined. Even though English is not the most widely spoken language in the World, it has become the language of Business, law, history, finance and of the internet.

Think about this, English only uses 26 letters to convey thousands of emotions and feelings. We use punctuation to convey the tone in which we mean different phrases and emphasize words and ideas to convey feelings that can be mistaken for different if not read correctly.With just 26 letters, you can move someone to tears or have them laughing, you can move a country but also just a singular person.

There are so many combinations of words and actions that make up human life and the ability to understand these are learned in the study of English. English has unique importance in our country. It has played a crucial role in building modern India. At present, it is one of the major languages used for communication. … It helps different natives of different regional dialects communicate with each other.

India is a country of Unity in Diversity, we have people from different states speaking different languages, English acts as a Bridge between two cultures.No matter who you are, a CEO, a manager, a regular employee or a housewife, English plays an important role in all our lives. We come to institutes to learn English because we have to, not because we want to.

Can you imagine how easy it would be if we wanted to learn English? English is the language of the Constitution, the Supreme Court, the High Courts and official departments. It has become a part of Indian life. English has great importance for the integrity of India.

5 Reasons Why You should Love English

1. English Opens New Career Opportunities:

 Learning English can help you pursue and obtain more career opportunities. These days, the job market is global—many companies need employees who can communicate with partners and clients all over the world. Very often, that means finding employees who speak English.

The global job market has even created new positions for bilingual people. By learning English, you could become a translator, a language teacher or an English marketing professional for a global company.

No matter what career path you decide to pursue, learning English is a valuable skill. It’ll help you become a better, more sought-after employee as well as a more well-rounded person.

2. English Tests can get you or your Kids into Schools:

 If you learn English well enough to pass tests like the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) you can study in universities across the globe.

A successful English test will show colleges and universities that you’re ready.

3. English is the language of the Internet:

 English is the most-used language online, with nearly 1 billion users typing and chatting in English. If you can understand and read English, you’ll be able to access and enjoy many more resources online.

You can read online news articles or leave comments on an English video. You can understand Tweets from English-speaking celebrities. You can participate in a discussion on a forum. The possibilities are endless!

Obviously, this is helpful if you’re just using the internet to browse and have fun. But many people and businesses also need to conduct research, market themselves or communicate and develop connections online—English will be crucial for success.

4. English Makes your life more Entertaining:

Want to put more books on your bookshelf? Want more options for a Friday movie night? Learning English will open a whole world of entertainment for you. You won’t need to rely on translations or subtitles—you can enjoy the authentic originals with all the emotions.

5. Learning English can make you smarter:

On top of all of these benefits, learning a new language such as English helps your brain function in new ways. Literally!

Research shows that learning a new language changes your brain structure (don’t worry, it’s in a good way). It impacts the parts of your brain that are responsible for memory, conscious thought and more. Put simply, learning a new language can make your brain stronger and more versatile, improving the way you think.

So this Valentine’s Day…. Don’t just read English Fall in love with ENGLISH!

What are Vowels and their Sounds

A vowel is classified as a speech sound produced by a comparatively open configuration of the vocal tract, with vibration of the vocal cords but without audible friction.

The letters A, E, I, O, and U are called vowels. The other letters in the alphabet are called consonants.

A vowel sound (but not necessarily a vowel in the actual spelling) will be present in a syllable.

The letter Y can be a vowel (as in the words “cry”, “sky”, “fly” or “why”), or it can be a consonant (as in “yellow”, “yacht”, “yam” or “yesterday”).

These five or six letters stand for about 20 vowel sounds in most English accents.[1] This important fact helps to explain why pronunciation can be difficult for both native speakers and learners of English.

  • The rest of the letters of the alphabet are consonants:

B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, P, Q, R, S, T, V, W, X, Y (sometimes), and Z

When a vowel sounds like its name, this is called a long sound. A vowel letter can also have short sounds. Whether a vowel has a long sound, a short sound, or remains silent, depends on its position in a word and the letters around it. Click on the following vowel letters to hear their long and short sounds.

a pronounced in the alphabet as ay (as in the word mate)

e pronounced in the alphabet as ee (as in the word edict)
i pronounced in the alphabet as ei (as in the word life)
o pronounced in the alpbabet as oh (as in the word only)
u pronounced in the alphabet as yu (as in the word union)

y pronounced in the alphabet as why is usually considered to be a consonant (as in yet). But it also is used as a vowel (as in merry), and then functions as a letter i.

The vowel a may be pronounced:

1. a as in apple (short a)
2. a as in father (long a)
3. ay as in mate (peculiarly English a)
4. as a schwa*.

5. “e” as in many.

6. “aw” as in mall.
7. “o” as in alter.

8. “eh” as in Mary.

 

The vowel e may be pronounced:

1. e as in get (short e)
2. e as in beta [“bay-ta”] (long e)
3. ee as in edict (peculiarly English e)
4. as a schwa*.

5. “uh” as in mercy.

6. or it may be silent as in life.

 

The vowel i may be pronounced:
1. i as in pit (short i)
2. i as in machine (long i)
3. ei as in life (peculiarly English i)
4. as a schwa”

 

The vowel o may be pronounced:
1. o as in font (short o)
2. oh as in only (long o)
3. “uh” as in some.

4. as a schwa*

 

The vowel u may be pronounced:
1. u as in full (short u)
2. u as in brute (long u)
3. yu as in union (peculiarly English u)
4. “uh” as in cup


What are Pronouns?

Neha has to study in order for Neha to get the job that Neha wants.

 A pronoun is a word that takes the place of or refers to a noun. You may recall that a noun is a word that names a person, place, thing, or idea. To cut down on repetitiveness, I can change my original sentence to:Neha has to study in order for her to get the job that she wants.

In this sentence, the word ‘Neha’ is a noun, and the words ‘her’ and ‘she’ are pronouns that replace that noun. There are several different types of pronouns. One type of pronoun is a personal pronoun that takes the place of a particular person or thing. In this lesson, we’ll focus on two categories of personal pronouns.

There four types of pronoun

1. Personal Pronoun

2. Possessive Pronoun

3. Reflexive Pronoun

4. Demonstrative Pronoun

 

Personal Pronouns

Personal pronoun describes a particular person or thing or group.

Personal pronoun describes the person speaking (I, me, we, us), the person spoken to (you), or the person or thing spoken about (he, she, it, they, him, her, them).

Example.

He helps poor.

The pronoun “he” in above sentence describes a person who helps poor.

Examples.

She is intelligent

They are playing chess.

He sent me a letter.

It is raining.

We love our country.

The teacher appreciated them.

I met him yesterday.

He gave her a gift.

Did you go to home?

 

Possessive Pronouns

Possessive Pronoun indicates close possession or ownership or relationship of a thing/person to another thing/person.

e.g. yours, mine, his,  hers, ours, theirs, hers,

Example.

This book is mine.

The pronoun “mine” describes the relationship between book and a person (me) who possesses this book or who is the owner of this book.

Examples

That car is hers.

Your book is old. Mine is new.

The pen on the table is mine.

The smallest cup is yours.

The voice is hers.

The car is ours not theirs.

I have lost my camera. May I use yours?

They received your letter. Did you received theirs.

 

Reflexive pronouns

Reflexive pronoun describes noun when subject’s action affects the subject itself.

e.g himself, yourself, herself, ourselves, themselves, itself  are reflexive pronouns.

Reflexive pronouns always act as objects not subjects, and they require an interaction between the subject and an object.

Examples.

I looked at myself in the mirror.

You should think about yourself.

They prepared themselves for completion.

She pleases herself by think that she will win the prize.

He bought a car for himself.

He locked himself in the room.

He who loves only himself is a selfish.

 

Demonstrative Pronouns.

Demonstrative pronoun is a pronoun that points to a thing or things.

e.g. this, that, these, those, none, neither

These pronouns point to thing or things in short distance/time or long distance/time.

Short distance or time: This, these.

Long distance or time: That, those.

Demonstrative pronouns “this and that” are used for singular thing while “these or those” are used for plural things.

 

Examples

This is black.

That is heavy.

Can you see these?

Those look attractive.

What is a Proverb?

A proverb is a simple and concrete saying and is popularly defined as short expressions, popularly known and repeated, that expresses a truth based on common sense or experience.

Few examples are:-

A good mind possesses a kingdom.

  • Meaning: Material assets are fleeting, but intellectual assets will basically stay with you for the rest of your life. Therefore, intellectual assets are much more worth than material ones.

Advisers run no risks.

  • Meaning: It is easy to give advice, but hard to act.

A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle.

  • You don’t lose anything by enlightening others.

 

Proverbs are wise sayings in a language based on the practical experiences of different kinds. They can mostly be used independently to explain a situation in very few words.
Here are some common proverbs used in English which you can also use in your day to day talks to cut the long talk short and still convey it with same conviction.

 

1. Absence makes the heart grow fonder – Our love for the loved ones grows more with the distance.
The two brothers deeply wish to meet as they haven’t seen each other since 10 years. After all, absence makes the heart grow fonder.

2. Accidents will happen in the best regulated families – Unforeseen can happen with anybody.
You need to be extremely cautious with electricity – The accidents will happen in the best regulated families.

3. Actions speak louder than words – What people do shows more about them than what they just say.
Hearing about her friend’s illness, she directly reached the hospital with a cheque of 50,000 /-. Her concern was evident – after all, actions speak louder than words.

4. Appearances are deceptive – Internal truth of a person is usually different from what is visible outside.
You should not believe strangers immediately. Appearances can be deceptive.

5. Never judge by appearances – Don’t use looks as the criteria to assess someone.
I saw the CEO of a big blue chip company hanging out with his friends at a local market in casual attire. Its true that you can’t judge someone by their appearance.

6. An apple a day keeps the doctor away – An apple eaten everyday keeps you in good health.
My father has always stayed in a good health with his habit of eating an apple everyday. For him, An apple a day keeps the doctor away has worked well.

7. Art is long, life is short. – Life is too short to learn all the art in this world.
She always complained of getting bored. I advised her to learn some music or painting. After all, Art is long, life is short.

8. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – If you help me, I’ll help you.
America is pushing the Indian government for FDI in retail. Indian government will get the foreign currency while America gets a big market for its goods. The principle is simple – You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.

9. Beauty is only skin deep – Never judge by appearance – A good looking woman may not necessarily be good by character.
My daughter-in-law is very beautiful but very cunning – Beauty is only skin deep.

Technical Tips for Emails

An email is a form of non-verbal communication so feelings and expressions of verbal communication can be conveyed only through the use of right words and phrases. There are few tips that needs to be followed when you write an email:-

1.)   Subject: A well-chosen subject line is an important opportunity to inform and persuade your reader. If you don’t include a subject line, then your recipient should need in order to make your message a top priority just by seeing your name. That could come across as arrogant, or at the very least, thoughtless.

2.)    Proofread – Proofread your email before you hit the send icon. All-caps comes across as shouting, and no-caps makes you look like a lazy teenager. Regardless of your intention, people will respond accordingly. Spellings are equally important to be correct. Avoid writing these ways:-

–        “thx 4 ur help 2day ur gr8!″

–       u want ur prof r ur boss 2 think u cant spl? LOL 😉

3.)   Avoid attachments – Rather than forcing you reader to download an attachment and open it in a separate program, you will probably get faster results if you just copy-paste the most important part of the document into the body of your message.

4.)   Examine the problem from every point of view – I know, I know, this is about as obvious as it gets. But you’d be surprised at the number of times customers call technical support and the guys at the other end just refuse to listen.

5.)   Try the solution out yourself – When you are typing a reply, don’t validate the solution because you tried it out in the past  or someone from your team explained it to you. Do it yourself, and see the result with your own eyes and confirm that it’s working before you hit that send button. Even the slightest missteps can, after all, turn a satisfied customer into an irate one.

6.)   Put yourself in their shoes – Every customer you speak to has a genuine problem. To them, the littlest of glitches could mean a critical issue that can cause bottlenecks. It is not okay for you to take them lightly just because the fix is already on the way.

7.)   Check for grammatical errors – While it’s impossible for you to make sure that every email is perfect you need to at least try. Make it a point to go through every reply at least once before sending it. If you don’t trust yourself to spot all the errors, trust in a tool like  the Spell check in MS Word that can point out all the errors.

Suitable Vocabularies of Emails

Unlike the other situations even emails require certain vocabularies to make the emails perfectly understandable. Some of the most important email vocabularies are:-

Common vocabularies of emails:-

to send a letter or an email

to send something by post/ mail

to email somebody

to get/ receive

to reply to

to check emails

sender

addressee

to attach

attachment

to enclose

enclosure

Email vocabularies

  • Attach – Please find the report attached/ As you can see from the attachment…
  • Best – All the best/ Best wishes/ Pass my best wishes on to John/ Best regards (In)
  • convenience – Please reply at your earliest convenience/ We would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused/ Please let me know what dates are convenient for you
  • Dear – Dear Sir or Madam/ Dear Mr Case/ Dear Alex/ Dear Sirs
  • Forward – I look forward to hearing from you soon/ Please forward this to John
  • Hear – I look forward to hearing from you (soon)/ Hope to hear from you soon/ It was really nice to hear from you
  • Hi – Hi/ Hi John/ Say “Hi” to Steve from me/ Julie says “Hi”
  • In – In connection with/ In advance
  • Inform – We regret to inform you that…/ We would like to inform you that…/ If you need any further information, please do not hesitate to contact me
  • Love – Love from/ Lots of love/ Send my love to John/ John sends his love
  • Mail – Snail mail/ I’ve sent you a hard copy in the mail
  • Note – This is just a quick note to say…/ Please note that…/ NB

Email collocations

  • Please – Please let me know if you have any questions/ If you need any further information, please do not hesitate to contact me at any time
  • Reference – With reference to…/ Your ref:/ Our ref:/ Reference number
  • Regards – Best regards/ Give my regards to John/ Regards
  • See – See you (soon/ then)/ It was a pleasure to see you again last week/ Hope to see you again soon
  • Sir – Dear Sir/ Dear Sir or Madam
  • Soon – I look forward to hearing from you soon/ See you soon/ Write soon
  • Sorry – Sorry it took me so long to get back to you/ Sorry not to reply sooner/ Sorry it’s been so long since I last wrote/ Sorry to write to you out of the blue
  • Text – Send a text/ Textspeak/ Text someone
  • Thanks/ Thank you – Thanks (again/ in advance)/ Thank you for your email/ quick reply/ getting back to me so quickly/ taking the time to see me yesterday
  • To – To whom it may concern/ I’m writing to you concerning…
  • Write – Write soon!/ Thanks for writing back so quickly/ I am writing to you in connection with…/ concerning…/ about…/ (in order) to…
  • Yours – Yours sincerely/ Yours faithfully/ Sincerely yours/ Yours

Situational Vocabulary – Group Discussions

Group discussion is a discussion among participants who have an agreed (serious) topic wherein they present their opinion and it also  requires certain vocabularies like follows:-

 

To begin a speech

Mr Chairman, ladies and gentlemen

Ladies and gentlemen, madam Chair.

 

Points of information

Asking for points of information: Point of information!

On that point, sir/madam!

Answering points of information: Yes, please!

No, thank you!

Declined!

I’ll take you in a moment.

Interrupting a point of information: Thank you, I got the point!

 

Structuring a speech

As my previous speaker has pointed out …

As my next speaker will explain …

I’m going to present three arguments: first … second … third

I’ve just told you about … Now I’m going to ….

 

 

Placing emphasis

This issue/problem cannot simply be shrugged off/dismissed/ignored

I’m convinced that

Let me repeat/reiterate the importance I attach to …

 

Strongly agreeing

You’re perfectly right

I quite agree with …

I cannot but agree/I couldn’t agree more

I accept the idea/proposal/suggestion without resevation

Precisely

Exactly

Absolutely

I am firmly/entirely/fully/completely/wholeheartedly in agreement with …

 

Mildly agreeing

You may be right there

That’s true, I suppose

I suppose so

 

Conceding

I must admit that your arguments have convinced me

You have convinced me that …

In order not to stand in the way of agreement …

 

 

Mild disagreement

That’s not really how I see it

I don’t really agree

 

Strong disagreement

I’m sorry, that’s out of the question

I believe it would be a mistake to …

I’, afraid I (totally) have to disagree with you

I beg to differ

I’m sorry I don’t agree at all

I simply can’t agree to this

Under no circumstances could I agree to …

 

Providing additional information

Perhaps I should be more specific

Without going too much into detail, I should perhaps mention …

I think it would be helpful to add/ point out ….

 

Checking understanding

Are you saying that …

Are you suggesting that …

Are you implying that …

If I understand you correctly …

If I follow you …

 

Interrupting

I’m terribly sorry to interrupt you, but …

Forgive me for interrupting, but …

Before you go any further, may I point out/indicate/explain

 

Handling an interruption

If you could bear with me for a moment, I shall deal with that point a little later

With your permission I would like to finish what I was saying

With all due respect I should like to finish the point I was making

If you would allow me to continue/finish?

 

Referring back

As we are saying earlier

To go back to what I was just saying

To go back to what X was saying earlier

 

Introducing new elements

I should now like to turn briefly to the question/problem of …

At this point I would like to raise the subject of …

There are some additional matters/questions which must be considered here

Another thought that occurs to me is …

 

Summing up an argument

If I might just go over the main points made?

To sum up/recapitulate, one can say that …

All the proposed solutions boil down to …

The most persuasive/compelling argument made today is …

 

Concluding

We’re running out of time so we’re going to have to stop here

To go over what’s been said

I’ve listened to both sides of the argument

I think I can sum it up

Unless anyone has anything else to add, I think that’s it

I think the following general conclusion may be drawn from the discussion…

Grow your Vocabulary

“The truth was suppressed by the members of the Jury.”

“He deceived me although he was in good terms with me.”

The words in bold letters are different in nature from each other. One may be a verb, one may be adverb etc. but they are different in their meanings. Each word has its own importance  that suits the sentence according to the structure.

The term “vocabulary” has a special as well as a general meaning. True, all vocabularies are grounded in the everyday words of the language, out of which grow the special vocabularies, but each such specialized group possesses a number of words of peculiar value for its own objects. These words may be used in other vocabularies also, but the fact that they are suited to a unique order of expression marks them as of special value to a particular craft or calling.

In this respect the public speaker differs not at all from the poet, the novelist, the scientist, the traveler. He must add to his everyday stock, words of value for the public presentation of thought. “A study of the discourses of effective orators discloses the fact that they have a fondness for words signifying power, largeness, speed, action, color, light, and all their opposites. They frequently employ words expressive of the various emotions. Descriptive words, adjectives used in fresh relations with nouns, and apt epithets, are freely employed. Indeed, the nature of public speech permits the use of mildly exaggerated words which, by the time they have reached the hearer’s judgment, will leave only a just impression.

Ways to improve vocabulary can be:-

  1. Start by learning practical vocabulary.  Learn words that are actually important to you at work, at home and out and about.  Use stick it notes and label things around your home.
  2. Expose yourself to as much English as possible by reading, watching the TV, films or the news and listening to the radio or music.
  3. Read an English magazine. If you can afford it take out a subscription to a magazine or newspaper.
  4. Try to memorize whole sentences, not just individual words. When you have learnt a word, write about it in context.
  5. Create or play word games. Scrabble, Crossword Puzzles, Hangman etc. are all great ways to play with words.
  6. When you know you need to learn a particular word list for a test, start using the words immediately.
  7. Keep a notebook to help you remember what you’ve learnt.
  8. Build a vocabulary web to organize your vocabulary about certain subjects like your personal life, professional life, family friends and relatives etc.

Memory Power is essential to learn English

A strong memory is important to remember things we have learnt and it totally depends on the health and vitality of your brain. Whether you’re a student studying for final exams, a working professional interested in doing all you can to stay mentally sharp, or a senior looking to preserve and enhance your grey matter as you age, there are lots of things you can do to improve your memory and mental performance. Similar to other studies English is also similar to a subject that needs to be remembered. Without remembering the correct vocabularies, or grammatical structure, you’ll not be able to respond effectively in the same. Here are some tips for improving memory when learning English.

Think In English To Develop The Basics

Trying to think in English will not only help you to recap on the language that you have learned already; it will also help you to focus on the language that is important in everyday life. Most people want to learn a language to be able to communicate on an everyday basis with common people within an English-speaking country. Also focusing on daily tasks and commonly used vocabulary will help you to develop your memory of the most used areas of the English language. Learning more specific terms will become easier once you have developed an in-depth knowledge of the basics.

Reading Is essential

One of the best ways to learn new words is to read. Reading allows you to learn about the general meaning or perhaps the nuances of a given word in any given context.

When you are reading, it is also easy to keep a learning diary, in which new words that you have learned can be recorded and recapped at a later date.

Use Memory Triggers

Vocabulary calendar, post-it notes, scraps of paper or storing words within your mobile phone are all great ways of triggering reminders for words that you are struggling to remember. Post-it notes are especially useful; try sticking the English word for a house-hold item to the item. Once you have used the item a handful of times, the repetition of reading and reciting the post it note will establish the English version of the word in your long term memory.

Watch Subtitled Movies for Pronunciation

Although watching sub-titled movies is not necessarily the best solution for learning specific meanings of words, there is an opportunity to establish and revise pronunciation outside of lesson time.

While you are watching the movie, be sure to keep a notepad nearby and try to jot down any words and sayings that you do not understand; you can then research these later.


Imagery
 helps those with a ‘visual’ memory.

It can be used to stimulate the brain by creating vivid images of the items to be remembered and then linking them together using a mental visualization. Startling or amusing images can really help.

There’s nothing intrinsically different about the brains of people with good memories, they have just trained them well.

How to Think in English

All speak our native languages fluently, quite naturally. The speech formation happens instantaneously and we don’t actually differentiate between a number of subsequent processes taking place when we speak. Think in English, instead of translating sentences from other languages that you’re familiar with. Translating sentences leads to grammatical mistakes and deteriorates the quality of your spoken English.

1. Don’t use a bilingual dictionary. Spending hours looking up words and definitions in an English-only dictionary helps you to memorize words better. When you search for a word, turning page after page, you naturally repeat it in your head. By the time you find the meaning, you remember the word.

2. Learn vocabulary in phrases, not single words. Our brains are pattern-matching machines that remember things put into context.

3. Start using the vocabulary as soon as possible. Never stop yourself from speaking until your language is perfect, you will be waiting forever! Always try to take initiative even if you are really scared because “practice makes perfect”.

4. Talk to yourself in English. When you were learning English (and you still do this), you would describe to myself whatever happened during the day. This gives you extra practice before you start explaining things to other people.

5. Get an English-speaking friend or partner. It is always easier to improve English with a companion especially if he or she is a native speaker. Regular chats in person, over the phone, text messages and other common activities brought me to the next level and you stopped talking to myself!

6. Travel. You used every opportunity to travel to English-speaking countries. Meeting numerous people in travelling and trying to keep in touch with them even after my trips. Facebook, WhatsApp, Viber, and emails definitely help.

The biggest challenge is dealing with the frustration that comes with not being able to fully express yourself. The key is to think positively and stay motivated!

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